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Vote for Antony Antoniou

Antony Antoniou – Reform UK Northampton North
Prospective Parliamentary Candidate
(PPC) 2024 General Election

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 Why I Have Issues with the EU

Introduction

In the interests of transparency and honest debate, I think it’s only right that I step off the ledge and reveal exactly what I think about the EU. I know this is divisive – in fact, if we’re to believe everything we’re told by the media, those who voted to leave are now either dead, senile or they’ve gone to get themselves an education.

My Opinion on the EU

As far as my opinion of the EU is concerned, I have no respect for the EU whatsoever, as an institution or as an experiment. I consider it to be a dishonest, insidious, calculating, arrogant authoritarian experiment that has already failed. The only way it feeds itself is by preying on yet more nations. Now that its back is against the wall with Germany in recession, they are calling for more countries to join. They remind me of the old empire building, where the empire of the day, whichever one it may be, needed to expand in order to have more booty to plunder from new countries. This is exactly what I believe the EU is doing.

I believe the EU answers to nobody. It has tied up the entire European Union – the member nations – in red tape and has enforced so much interdependency that these nations can’t even move. The EU can’t grow anymore because it can’t even make any trade deals. It only needs one of the countries to object and the deal is off. For example, we’ve been trying to sign the Mercosur trade pact for years but every time it’s blocked at the last minute by France, who wants to protect its own industry. In their defense, why shouldn’t they? But why should we not be able to have a trade deal to guarantee cheaper food, cheaper oil or whatever it may be just because France doesn’t want its own market to be affected? This is the problem with the EU and why it will invariably fail.

Germany’s Energy Crisis

Germany, the bastion of Vorsprung durch Technik, is going to be running around igniting more coal-fired power stations this winter than it has done for years. These arrogant nitwits, when they were told by a president who nobody likes that they were making a grave mistake becoming dependent on Russian gas, laughed. But to quote another smart man, they’re not laughing now, are they? Because this winter Germany is going to be kicking out more crap into our atmosphere than it has done for years through its own arrogance.

There was an element of calculated, misguided planning at play too, because it is my opinion that the EU were hoping the war in Ukraine and sanctions against Russia would give them the opportunity to manipulate their way into controlling Russian oil and gas. Unfortunately it didn’t work out that way, hence the reason that when the war first started, Germany’s contribution to Ukrainian defence was to send 500 helmets.

The EU’s Decline

I think the EU will fall apart – it is inevitable – because it cannot move anymore. It is tied up in knots. All we have to consider is that back in 1970, the EU in its current size plus the UK represented 35% of global GDP. That’s when the US was only 24%. By 2022, without the UK, that had dropped to 16.5%. It was projected to be 15.5% this year and with Germany plunging into recession, that is being revised down to below 15%. On its current trajectory, by the end of this decade the EU will represent less than 10% of global GDP.

Who in their right mind would want to be confined to a dying, corrupt, authoritarian regime? But that’s not the real reason I have issues with the EU, or rather, not the only reason.

Germany’s Manipulation

Let’s go back to the Exchange Rate Mechanism in 1989. Later that year, the fall of the Berlin Wall bankrupted Germany through the cost of reunification. Then we had Black Wednesday in 1992 which cost this country billions because we were tied into the ERM. You’d have thought that would have opened people’s eyes but it didn’t. People like Soros made billions on the back of misery in this country. Following Black Wednesday, Norman Lamont decided to pull us out of the ERM.

Two years later in 1995, Germany championed the entry of Turkey as a trading partner with the EU. This meant Turkey could manufacture goods outside the EU without any restrictions, health and safety obligations or other EU country requirements. But those goods could be imported into the EU without tariffs because Germany decided to outsource a lot of its manufacturing to its old friend. Let’s not forget that Turkey, as the Ottomans, sided with the Germans and Austro-Hungarians in World War I. They remained neutral in World War II and Turkey has the largest Turkish population outside of Turkey itself.

So Germany decided to outsource everything to its old friend and make its old friend an associate member. What that meant though is Turkey then slowly undercut all the textile industries across Southern Europe – Portugal, Spain, Italy, Greece, Cyprus. Within 5 years, all of their textile industry, give or take, had gone. Their economies have been ravaged in a way they have never recovered from.

The Euro’s Introduction

The next step came in 1998 when Germany entered the Euro, which was a digital currency for just 3 years before it was introduced as a physical currency. Germany entered approximately 10-15% undervalued. The Deutschmark went in 10-15% lower, giving Germany a competitive advantage over its neighbours.

Basically, Germany – the instigator of the Euro – shafted its neighbours by setting its exchange rate in stone at a lower rate to give itself a competitive advantage. The other countries then made up the shortfall in what they were buying from Germany by borrowing from Germany. Deutsche Bank stepped in and began lending to Germany’s neighbours.

Fast forward 5-10 years and Portugal, Spain, Greece and countries around Italy were all in serious debt to Deutsche Bank. Once it plunged countries like Greece into extreme debt and was worried it might lose some money, Deutsche Bank sold off a lot of those bonds. After selling off lots of them, it then devalued them and wiped out the people who had bought them – which included other smaller countries.

Conclusion

Who in their right mind would want these people to make decisions about our country after a history of manipulation, currency tricks and debt schemes? The EU is a failed experiment that has ravaged European economies for its own gain. It’s time for Britain to fully free itself from this tangled web.

Summary and Key Points

– The EU is a failed authoritarian experiment that has tied member states in bureaucratic knots and damaged economies like Greece through debt schemes.

– Germany has repeatedly manipulated the EU and European economies to its advantage, such as with the Euro conversion rate and outsourcing manufacturing to Turkey.

– The EU share of global GDP has plunged from 35% to below 15% and will likely fall below 10% this decade as it declines in relevance.

– The EU cannot accomplish trade deals due to requiring agreement from all members. This inaction will contribute to its downfall.

– Russia’s war on Ukraine exposed the EU’s vulnerability and overreliance on Russian energy. The EU attempted to gain control of Russian resources but failed.

– Arrogant EU energy policy has forced Germany to reopen coal plants, despite warnings from experts. This winter will see significant emissions as a result.

– The EU craves new member states to plunder as its power dwindles. Britain made the right decision escaping before being drained fully.

– The EU has ravaged economies in southern Europe through currency manipulation and debt schemes. It operates only in its own interest.

– The EU lacks transparency and answers to no one. Complete authority with no accountability is a recipe for corruption.

– In summary, the EU experiment has failed and fallen far short of its promised prosperity. The path forward is for Britain to fully cut ties and determine its own future.

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